DGA Quarterly Fall 2008 Funny Business

The Not-So-Wild Life

Adam McKay

The director of Talladega Nights and Step Brothers wonders what's happened to the glamorous life-and if it ever existed.

Funny Business

First-person columns written by directors about their humorous experiences working in features and television.

Mitch Hurwitz
Summer 2014
Mitch Hurwitz

Mitch Hurwitz, the director and creator of Arrested Development offers some choice—and not so choice—words about meeting the demands of the job.

Richard Shepard
Spring 2014
Richard Shepard

For a director, getting an actor to try a radical new look is not always an easy process. Say, Jude Law in mutton chops?

Winter 2014
Seth Gordon

The director of The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters and Horrible Bosses explains why making documentaries is ideal training for directing comedies.

Summer 2013
Ken Kwapis

The director of the pilot and finale of The Office reflects on the unconventional beginning and wistful ending of the popular series.

Spring 2013
Jake Kasdan

Jake Kasdan, the director of the New Girl pilot, explains why pilot season is a savage, archaic, and flawed system that brings out the worst in people—but sometimes a director’s best work.

Winter 2013
Troy Miller

Troy Miller, the director of the opening short films for the Academy Awards explains what it's like asking George Clooney to kiss Billy Crystal, and other embarrasing moments.

Fall 2012
Rod Lurie

The director of The Contender and Commander in Chief has directed six presidents in all. Here’s what he’s learned on the campaign trail.

DGA Quarterly Summer 2011 Funny Business Mark Waters
Summer 2012
Mark Waters

The director of Mean Girls and Mr. Popper’s Penguins explains how playing sports prepared him for the toughest game of all—directing comedy.

Funny Business David Dobkin
Spring 2012
David Dobkin

David Dobkin, the director of Wedding Crashers and The Change-Up shares ten tips learned through trial and error-not divine inspiration.

DGA Quarterly Fall 2011
Fall 2011
Beth McCarthy Miller

Shooting a live episode of the comedy series sounded like a good idea on paper.

DGA Quarterly Winter 2012 Funny Business David Frankel
Winter 2012
David Frankel

The director of The Devil Wears Prada reflects on the valuable advice he got from cast and crew while making the film—whether he wanted it or not.

DGA Quarterly Summer 2011 Funny Business James Burrows
Summer 2011
James Burrows

James Burrows, the legendary director of Taxi, Cheers, Will & Grace, and numerous other hits says you never know what’s going to happen on the set—and that’s what makes it fun.

DGA Quarterly 2011 Funny Business Bethany Rooney
Spring 2011
Bethany Rooney

Inspired by The Beatles, a young director tries to be positive. And it works!

DGA Quarterly Winter 2010-11 Frank Oz
Winter 2011
Frank Oz

The director of Death at a Funeral considers how Bob Hope and Bing Crosby could get away with anything in their Road films.

Fall 2010
Todd Holland

Veteran television comedy director Todd Holland wonders if failure is more valuable than success. After all, that’s what his mother told him.

Summer 2010
Andy Fickman

The director of Race to Witch Mountain and Reefer Madness: The Movie Musical wonders what makes a director a director. Maybe it's the chair.

Spring 2010
Nicholas Stoller

The director of Forgetting Sarah Marshall says alternate takes are not just for the indecisive. To prove his point, he looked back and dug up some you may not have known about.

DGAQ Funny Business - Linda Mendoza
Winter 2010
Linda Mendoza

Being pigeonholed isn't for Linda Mendoza-neither as a Hispanic woman or single- vs. multi-camera TV director.

Fall 2009
Paul Feig

The director of The Office and Arrested Development offers some helpful hints that may improve your life on the set. First of all, dress ofor the occasion.

Summer 2009
Larry Charles

Directing Bob Dylan on Masked and Anonymous presented a unique wardrobe problem.

Spring 2009
Harold Ramis

In this article, Director Harold Ramis (1944 - 2014) shares his humorous perspective on what he learned about directing while acting for other directors.

Winter 2009
Dennis Dugan

Sometimes trying to make funny movies will leave you talking to yourself.

DGA Quarterly Fall 2008 Funny Business
Fall 2008
Adam McKay

The director of Talladega Nights and Step Brothers wonders what's happened to the glamorous life-and if it ever existed.

DGA Quarterly Magazine Summer 2008 Funny Business Garry Marshall
Summer 2008
Garry Marshall

The director of The Princess Diaries and Pretty Woman writes about his unconventional methods for keeping things loose on the set.

DGA Quarterly Spring 2008 Funny Business Ackerman
Spring 2008
Andy Ackerman

Here's what happens if you pay too much attention to the trades.

DGA Quarterly Winter 2007-08 Funny Business
Winter 2007/2008
Paul Mazursky

Sure, going to the Academy Awards is fun, but you have to dress the part, and forget about the traffic

DGA Quarterly Fall 2007 Funny Business
Fall 2007
Adam Shankman

The director of Hairspray wonders why all directors don't want to make musicals.

DGA Quarterly Summer 2007
Summer 2007
Shawn Levy

The director of Night at the Museum explains just how far he'll go to help actors find their performance.

DGA Quarterly Spring 2007 Funny Business Jay Roach
Spring 2007
Jay Roach

The director of Meet the Fockers and Austin Powers looks for his "Inner Eastwood."

DGA Quarterly Winter 2006 Funny Business Carl Reiner
Winter 2006
Carl Reiner

Carl Reiner has been hosting the DGA Awards for 20 years. His secret? Worry, trust and unpreparedness.

DGA Quarterly Magazine Fall 2006 Funny Business Tolan
Fall 2006
Peter Tolan

Rescue Me's Peter Tolan muses on the problems of working with kids and animals. He prefers animals.

DGA Quarterly Spring 2006 Bob Goldthwait
Spring 2006
Bob Goldthwait

Bob Goldthwait explains why his film Stay isn't as outrageous as you might think.

DGA Quarterly Magazine Fall 2005 Funny Business Weide
Fall 2005
Bob Weide

From the very start, director/executive producer Bob Weide has helped orchestrate the madness and mayhem of Curb Your Enthusiasm. His advice: Don't try this at home.